Categoría: Evanescence

Evanescence kicks off Synthesis Tour at Pearl Concert Theater in Las Vegas

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Evanescence kicks off its tour in support of the upcoming album ‘Synthesis’ at The Pearl concert theater at Palms Casino Resort on October 14, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada and here we have some pictures, videos and band reaction after the show.

Photos

Live Shows > Live Shows 2017 > Pearl Concert Theater, Las Vegas, Nevada • 14/10/2017

Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B-Ns418959AHl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B-Ns418959AHx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B43n2NcBACgJl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B43n2NcBACgJx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B46uyB4bP1Sol.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B46uyB4bP1Sox.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B99fy6HuN6Mdl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B99fy6HuN6Mdx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B9elbPiCjk4cl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2B9elbPiCjk4cx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BAMZeqWXCZTil.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BAMZeqWXCZTix.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BgRZiM_HDywKl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BgRZiM_HDywKx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BHJwczgMSrORl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BHJwczgMSrORx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BJl85SFMOQzwl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BJl85SFMOQzwx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BjRO25pXTYYrl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BjRO25pXTYYrx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BkrCwqawqWWpl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BkrCwqawqWWpx.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BlaGklXLL3kkl.jpg
Evanescence2BKicks2BOff2BTour2BPearl2BConcert2BTheater2BlaGklXLL3kkx.jpg

Videos

Evanescence on Twitter after the first Synthesis show

Inside Synthesis: Episode 3 – Harp

EVANESCENCE - Inside Synthesis: Episode 3 - Harp – Source: YouTube evanescencevideo

EVANESCENCE – Inside Synthesis: Episode 3 – Harp – Source: YouTube evanescencevideo

In the third episode of “Inside Synthesis”, Amy finds out her first Harp teacher, Kirsten Copley, is performing on the new Evanescence album.

Source: Evanescence YouTube Channel

Evanescence’s My Immortal on “Rock Ballads” Spotify Playlist

My Immortal (Single)

The Evanescence’s super hit and single My Immortal from Fallen in its version “My Immortal – Band Version” was added to the Rock Ballads playlist on Spotify.

Listen to it here and make sure you follow the playlist on Spotify!

Dazed with Amy Lee: “Evanescence’s Amy Lee on drama and going back with Synthesis”

Amy Lee

We meet the rock icon to talk about the band’s new album, working with women and the beast that is fame

For those among us who were watching Kerrang! religiously in 2003, there likely isn’t a more memorable image than that of Evanescence’s Amy Lee scaling a giant building in a flimsy nightie while screaming save me from the nothing I’ve become into the night. “Bring Me to Life”, with its huge chorus, guitars, and rock-rap went quickly platinum, brought Evanescence to global relevance, and ensured that they wouldn’t ever be forgotten. Even if that’s the only song of theirs you know, the opening piano is probably more than enough to get you amped up enough to start screaming (badly) along.

Evanescence followed 2003’s Fallen, their most commercially successful album, with The Open Door in 2006. After a hiatus and another change in line-up, the band returned in 2011 with Evanescence before going back on hiatus. Now, in 2017, the band are very much back – and while their continued legacy is thanks in part to their huge, dramatic sound and that one, timeless banger, it’s more than anything thanks to their one remaining original member: Amy Lee. In a scene and genre full to the brim with men, Amy Lee, with her outrageously impressive voice and dramatic gothic decadence, was instantly iconic.

Amy Lee has been busy in the last few years with solo work including film scores and a children’s album. But now, Evanescence, with new guitarist Jen Majura, are well and truly back. This November they’ll release Synthesis, a reworking and re-recording of some of their biggest hits (yes, including “Bring Me To Life”) with a full orchestra and electronics. It also includes brand new songs, and is the precursor to more new music and a full tour from the band. We spoke to Amy Lee, eternal alt icon, about Synthesis, why it was the right time to revisit their old work, and being a very famous woman in music since she was just 21.

The new album sounds and feels very Björk-esque, that mix of electronic with strings. Not identical, it’s your own thing, but similar.

Amy Lee: I’m a huge Björk fan, I’ll take that as a huge compliment. I think the difference might be taking that traditional Evanescence sound which has those indulgently dramatic and epic moments. Going full on with them, sometimes I feel like the drama is all a little bit too much these days. I guess part of that’s just growing up as your tastes change. This album was an outlet to go, ‘You know what, we’re just going to go completely nuts with it and let the orchestra do all of that stuff we were hinting at before and go ahead and be a little bit more classical and dramatic and make the piano parts even more Mozart inspired. Just kind of tricky crazy old school.’ It was just really fun, it’s a fun project. I’m looking forward to doing it live. I’m a little bit nervous, it’s definitely different and asking a little bit more of myself and everyone. But I’m excited.

Why did you decide to rework your old songs on Synthesis?

Amy Lee: Our music from the beginning has always had the elements of very intricate and beautiful arrangements by David Campbell, but it also has this other side of the electronic programming that I really love. In fact, most of what I listen to is in that world. Once we put everything on there; the guitars, the big rock drums, you go through all the different levels of production to the point that you have the finished product of the song but a lot of that beautiful intricate stuff gets kind of buried. Many times I’ve left the studio and wished I had a mix just of the string arrangements and the programming together with vocals because there’s something really beautiful about that. I think that was my initial thought but that snowballed into something a lot bigger, because going back in with David Campbell he completely rearranged these songs in a way that takes the whole orchestra and lets it fill in all this space that isn’t taken up by the full band at full power all the time.

Continue reading

NEWS.COM.AU: Evanescence have removed the “compromise” rap from biggest hit

Amy Lee of US band Evanescence is touring Australia — with a full orchestra — next year. Picture: Sony Source: Supplied

Amy Lee of US band Evanescence is touring Australia — with a full orchestra — next year. Picture: Sony Source: Supplied

Re-recording their biggest hits with an orchestra means Evanescence’s Amy Lee has been able to remove *that* rap from Bring Me to Life

EVANESCENCE’S Amy Lee is rewriting history on the band’s new album.

Their fourth release Synthesis is the opposite of an unplugged effort — rather Lee has re-recorded the band’s old material an even more dramatic and bombastic manner, with a full orchestra and heavy electronics.

That includes their breakthrough 2003 hit Bring Me To Life. And there’s something missing from the version you know — that rap, by guest vocalist Paul McCoy.

“God bless the rap, it’s part of what got us on the radio I guess,” Lee says. “At least according to all the rules of radio that I don’t agree with or understand. The rap wasn’t part of our original idea or sound, it was a compromise in many ways. So to be able to go back to the original vision for the song was great.”

Here’s Evanescence looking moody, with singer Amy Lee far left. Picture: Sony Music Source: Supplied

Here’s Evanescence looking moody, with singer Amy Lee far left. Picture: Sony Music Source: Supplied

It’s not uncommon for an artist to go back and record their songs — Lee embraced being to able to revisit the band’s signature hit after performing it live at every concert they’ve played since it was release.

“The recording of a song that ends being the one you hear the most through history is usually when the song was just freshly written. You’re still learning it yourself and getting used to what the notes are and how the parts go. That’s true for Bring Me to Life for sure. After doing it live for so long there’s different vocal choices I’ve made and different things we got to use in this version.”

And no rap.

“I forget the rap’s there now to be honest,” Lee says. “At the time it was a big issue, it was our first single. I wanted people to understand who we were. That’s a struggle you always fight as an artist. If we only had the one hit, if no one ever heard from us again then nobody would understand who we were. We’ve made it past that point so the rap doesn’t make me angry any more. I’m so glad to put a new version out there without the rap though.”

Continue reading

Post Archive:

Page 9 of 18 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 18