Evanescence’s ‘Synthesis’ Cracks Billboard Top 10

Evanescence

Evanescence‘s “Synthesis” sold 34,000 equivalent album units in the week ending November 16, according to Nielsen Music, to land at position No. 8 on the Billboard 200 chart. Of that sum, 30,000 were in traditional album sales. The set is a reimagining of some of Evanescence‘s best-loved songs — as well as a couple of new ones. “Synthesis” is Evanescence‘s first album since its 2011 self-titled release, which debuted at No. 1. The new album is the group’s fourth top 10 effort, following “Evanescence”“The Open Door” (No. 1 in 2006) and “Fallen” (No. 3, 2003).

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Amy Lee in TeamRock interview: “Being a female in the music industry a lot of the time means being overly sexualised”

Evanescence

In a new interview with Amy Lee for TeamRock she talks about growing up, being cool, and sexuality in music. Check it out:

Synthesis revisits the old songs. Do you remember how it felt to be twenty years old and working on Fallen?

Unfortunately yes [laughs]. How would I describe myself back then? Wide-eyed, full of huge dreams, fairly insecure. But I think that’s pretty common. When we’re young we feel like we’re the only ones that kinda hate ourselves. I remember struggling with feeling like I didn’t deserve to be where I was. So definitely an emotional, hormonal moment. I still have a lot of big feelings, but it seems like the whole world is falling down around you sometimes when you’re a kid.

Didn’t being hugely successful make the problems go away?

No! Having lots of people all over the world touched by our music was a dream come true. But to have thousands, even millions, of people feel like they know you in an intimate way, it was difficult. I’m at a place in my life now where I think I’m pretty good at dealing with it. That whole thing, it’s not so scary any more. But it was scary in the beginning, for sure.

Continue reading Amy Lee in TeamRock interview: “Being a female in the music industry a lot of the time means being overly sexualised”

Dazed with Amy Lee: “Evanescence’s Amy Lee on drama and going back with Synthesis”

Amy Lee

We meet the rock icon to talk about the band’s new album, working with women and the beast that is fame

For those among us who were watching Kerrang! religiously in 2003, there likely isn’t a more memorable image than that of Evanescence’s Amy Lee scaling a giant building in a flimsy nightie while screaming save me from the nothing I’ve become into the night. “Bring Me to Life”, with its huge chorus, guitars, and rock-rap went quickly platinum, brought Evanescence to global relevance, and ensured that they wouldn’t ever be forgotten. Even if that’s the only song of theirs you know, the opening piano is probably more than enough to get you amped up enough to start screaming (badly) along.

Evanescence followed 2003’s Fallen, their most commercially successful album, with The Open Door in 2006. After a hiatus and another change in line-up, the band returned in 2011 with Evanescence before going back on hiatus. Now, in 2017, the band are very much back – and while their continued legacy is thanks in part to their huge, dramatic sound and that one, timeless banger, it’s more than anything thanks to their one remaining original member: Amy Lee. In a scene and genre full to the brim with men, Amy Lee, with her outrageously impressive voice and dramatic gothic decadence, was instantly iconic.

Amy Lee has been busy in the last few years with solo work including film scores and a children’s album. But now, Evanescence, with new guitarist Jen Majura, are well and truly back. This November they’ll release Synthesis, a reworking and re-recording of some of their biggest hits (yes, including “Bring Me To Life”) with a full orchestra and electronics. It also includes brand new songs, and is the precursor to more new music and a full tour from the band. We spoke to Amy Lee, eternal alt icon, about Synthesis, why it was the right time to revisit their old work, and being a very famous woman in music since she was just 21.

The new album sounds and feels very Björk-esque, that mix of electronic with strings. Not identical, it’s your own thing, but similar.

Amy Lee: I’m a huge Björk fan, I’ll take that as a huge compliment. I think the difference might be taking that traditional Evanescence sound which has those indulgently dramatic and epic moments. Going full on with them, sometimes I feel like the drama is all a little bit too much these days. I guess part of that’s just growing up as your tastes change. This album was an outlet to go, ‘You know what, we’re just going to go completely nuts with it and let the orchestra do all of that stuff we were hinting at before and go ahead and be a little bit more classical and dramatic and make the piano parts even more Mozart inspired. Just kind of tricky crazy old school.’ It was just really fun, it’s a fun project. I’m looking forward to doing it live. I’m a little bit nervous, it’s definitely different and asking a little bit more of myself and everyone. But I’m excited.

Why did you decide to rework your old songs on Synthesis?

Amy Lee: Our music from the beginning has always had the elements of very intricate and beautiful arrangements by David Campbell, but it also has this other side of the electronic programming that I really love. In fact, most of what I listen to is in that world. Once we put everything on there; the guitars, the big rock drums, you go through all the different levels of production to the point that you have the finished product of the song but a lot of that beautiful intricate stuff gets kind of buried. Many times I’ve left the studio and wished I had a mix just of the string arrangements and the programming together with vocals because there’s something really beautiful about that. I think that was my initial thought but that snowballed into something a lot bigger, because going back in with David Campbell he completely rearranged these songs in a way that takes the whole orchestra and lets it fill in all this space that isn’t taken up by the full band at full power all the time.

Continue reading Dazed with Amy Lee: “Evanescence’s Amy Lee on drama and going back with Synthesis”

19 Questions About Love and Death with ​Evanescence’s Amy Lee

19 Questions About Love and Death with ​Evanescence’s Amy Lee


The singer of everyone’s favourite goth rock band schools us on two of life’s most unavoidable and mysterious concepts.

Evanescence are omnipresent, kind of like oxygen or a general sense of dread. Whether you’ve stuck with them over the years – or the introductory tinkle of their 2003 hit single “Bring Me To Life” still sends you back to afternoons spent in your childhood living room recording music videos on Kerrang! to a VHS – this unassuming rock band from Arkansas have come to define an era where everyone in the charts had a chinbeard or a corset on.

Their operatically-charged rock – complete with what we can now describe as an ICONIC video in which vocalist Amy Lee dangles perilously from the window of a high rise building like a brave civilian in a Marvel film – has bagged them multi-million album sales, two Grammys, and a meme-like status in modern society. Most recently, “Bring Me To Life” was reinterpreted by Jon Sudano – man, YouTuber, saviour of 2016 – who gave it a lease of life by singing the lyrics to Smash Mouth’s “All Star” over the top. Considering he’s done the same with more recent pop smashers like Adele’s “Hello” and Taylor Swift’s “22”, it’s telling that a cover of a thirteen-year-old nu metal single is, by a landslide, the most popular thing he’s ever done. But why? What is it about Evanescence that makes people feel so warm and cosy inside? As Sudano said when I put that very question to him in an interview recently: “Once two hits from the late 90s/early 2000s collided together, it triggered something in everyone’s brains reminding them just how cool shockproof CD players and JNCO jeans were.”

As usual, Sudano is absolutely right. Their band name may mean “quickly fading or disappearing”, but appreciation for Evanescence has only increased over time. Evanescence are an emotional safe place. They are a soothing bedrock in a scary and unpredictable world. In light of recent events, their compositions have the requisite level of drama we need to emote vicariously through. Having fully embraced her recent motherhood, Amy Lee just released an album of lullabies so children may also experience this sense of existential comfort, lending the vocal chords that brought you “Wake me up inside!” to ukulele-driven songs with lyrics like “There’s a monkey in the band, the muffins are sleepy”.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I don’t know shit about anything. I can barely scan an onion through a self-service machine without setting off three alarms calling for assistance, let alone figure out what a functioning relationship is. I need help and guidance to get through this thing called life. So, with a celebratory boxset and a new (yes, new!) single called “Even In Death” on the way – plus a tangerine hate-monger about to enter The White House and cause everyone a lot of stress – we figured now would be an optimum moment to call Amy Lee and ask her a bunch of questions about two of the worlds most unavoidable and most mysterious concepts: love and death.

Noisey: Hi Amy Lee! So, let’s start with the basics, shall we. What is love?
Amy Lee: Ah yes, so simple. “What is love?” People have been asking that question since the beginning of time trying to figure it out. I think love is putting somebody else before yourself.

If you love someone but they don’t love you back does it still count?
Of course!

When did you first fall in love?
I was obsessed with this boy Wade in the first grade. I don’t know if you could call it real love, but I thought it was at the time. His mum once brought cookies or something to class, and she walked out of the room and I burst out of my seat and chased her down the hallway and said, “Hey Mrs… (I don’t remember her last name) I just have to tell you something. It’s important. I just need you to know. I really like your son.” And she looked at me and said, “Aww, thank you for telling me!” And I was like “Ok, that’s all, don’t tell him, bye.” That was the height of my bravery in love.

Have you ever tried to make someone fall in love with you?
Sure. But usually it was by being the girl in the corner. My way was never to come on strong, it was to be the opposite of all the people doing that. Like, you know what, everyone else is gonna be all up in your face, I’m just going to sit here and do some awesome sketch until you notice how amazing I am on your own.

If music is the food of love, what is the food of death?
They both could be music? It would have to be a literal thing to make you die, but whether it’s the most wonderful or terrible emotion I think music aids and soothes it all.

Are you scared of love?
No it’s wonderful.

Are you scared of death?
I’m not scared to die but I’m scared of the separation that death causes.

Do you believe in live after death?
Yes.

Do you believe in life after love?
Ask Cher.

Why do we obsess over these two aspects of life more than any other?
They’re both beyond our understanding. Death especially. It’s not like you know anyone who’s ever been there and come back. It’s terrifying in a lot of ways. It’s this thing that happens to every single person who has ever walked on earth, but we don’t know what it’s going to look like. One of the most fascinating things about life, I think, is death. And love can completely change you. It can make you physically ill, it’s such an amazing force. It’s also something we can’t see or control.

Is it possible to die because you love too much?
I think your actions can definitely lead you to do things that will take you there.

What is the greatest love song of all time?
“All is Full of Love” by Bjork.

Have you ever died in a dream you’ve had?
Yes. People have all these rules about dreams like you can’t die or if you die you wake up, but none of them apply to me. I’m a very vivid dreamer, it’s the weirdest thing. I’ll dream that I woke up, brush my teeth, picked out my specific outfit that’s right over there on my suitcase – and then I’ll wake up, like “None of that happened? Ugh. I have to do it all over again!” Usually if I die in a dream the rest of the dream is darkness and I’ll hear music or something…

Have you ever written a song in a dream?
Yes. You know how in dreams you can kind of dictate what you do? Like you’re about to walk into a room and you know there’s something scary in there and you start thinking really hard about it. It’s the same thing with this. It feels in the dream like you’re listening but you know to some degree that you’re creating. I’m subconsciously writing but it feels like I’m just listening to music. It doesn’t happen very often, but I wrote a song called “Secret Door” that way. I heard the music and woke up and I drove to the studio, didn’t get changed or brush my teeth or anything, and recorded it so I wouldn’t forget. The cover I did of “With or Without You” happened that way too. I heard these big synths and the melody being different…

If you were a character in an action film which would you be?
Wonderwoman!

Do you believe in the soul?
Of course.

Do you believe in soul mates?
I don’t know… I think love is bigger than just this one person that you can’t control and you don’t have to work for it you just automatically love each other. Love is something you have to actively do.

Does love feel different as you get older?
Yeah. It goes deeper, it means more, especially when you develop history with someone it’s something you can’t replace.

In Titanic, a film about love and death, Rose drops Jack into the sea. Should she have made room for him on the door? Don’t you think they both could’ve fit?
No! She had to drop him so she could survive, because that’s what she knew he would want.

Yeah, screw Jack! Thanks Amy Lee.

Source: Noisey

Amy Lee: <em>“Anoto ideas en las bolsas de mareo”</em>

Amy Lee: “Anoto ideas en las bolsas de mareo”

Amy LeeAmy Lee habló el sitio de padres de Brooklyn (NY) A Child Grows sobre “Dream Too Much” y como se inspira día a día. A ti te inspira cocinar?, a Amy escribir en bolsas de mareo en los aviones.

Cuéntanos cómo se metió en la música cuando eras niña…

Había música a mi alrededor mientras crecía, mi padre era un locutor de radio y músico, mis dos abuelas tocaban el piano y órgano y mis padres cantaban todo el tiempo. Me encantaba pasar el rato en el trabajo de mi padre y la escuchar discos antiguos, y estaba desesperada por aprender piano cuando tenía 8 años.

¿Cuáles son tus inspiraciones musicales?

Mi primera gran inspiración fue la película “Amadeus”. Me conmovió tanto por la música apasionada, intrincada y, sin embargo pegadiza de Mozart- yo estaba decidida a ser un creadora como él. Entonces llegué a la adolescencia y la escena grunge y la música alternativa de los años 90 fue explotando y estaba totalmente enganchada sobre Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Garbage, Portishead, Nine Inch Nails, Soundgarden… demasiado buena música para nombrar. Bjork ha sido una gran inspiración para mí desde que tenía 13 y aún lo sigue siendo- no puedo decidir lo que es más poderoso: su voz o su mente. Vivir en Nueva York me inspira la música y los sonidos flotando por toda la ciudad. Un tipo tocando la bocina por el parque, los tambores de acero haciendo eco a través del metro. En este momento la alarma del coche de alguien va apagándose-me está inspirando a gritar por la ventana.

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¿A qué lugares te gusta que ir para alimentar su espíritu creativo?

Continue reading Amy Lee: “Anoto ideas en las bolsas de mareo”