Synthesis Reaches #1 on iTunes Rock or Alternative Stores in 40 Countries!

Here’s Evanescence looking moody, with singer Amy Lee far left. Picture: Sony Music Source: Supplied

Evanescence’s just released fourth album Synthesis — out via  BMG in the United States and Sony in Europe/Australia — has debuted as the #1 Rock Album in the United States —the #4 best-selling album overall–and at #8 on the Top 200 album charts. In its debut week, Synthesis reached #1 on the iTunes Rock and Alternative charts in over 40 countries worldwide.

Get your copy of Evanescence’s new release here!

Source: Evanescence.com

Q&A with Amy Lee on Stack: “I wanted to flip the script and challenge myself [about vocal rhythms on new track Imperfection]”

Amy Lee

We asked Evanescence frontwoman Amy Lee all about the band’s new album Synthesis – a collection of re-recordings (and two new tracks) of some of the alt-rock group’s most treasured songs, rearranged with full orchestra.

It’s amazing how so many of the orchestral instruments sound like they were always supposed to be there, and the electronic beats you’ve chosen have a very industrial feel, which fits the Evanescence style beautifully. Were many of these elements already imagined in your mind before you started this project?Synthesis

Thank you! Yes, actually. I didn’t know what the whole thing would sound like when we were done; there is so much detail that was created as we went. But honestly, this is more like the way I hear our music in my head.

Some of the decisions you’ve made here with arrangements, do they reflect ways that you’ve developed the tracks during their lives as part of your live setlist?

Yes. Not in the obvious ways. Our usual live show is very much about amplifying and energizing things to make a non-stop, heavy rock show. We add parts to build drama, make four bars into eight and add a drum solo, go straight from one song to the next. But this project isn’t feeding that need – it’s meant to be experienced in a different way. The things that I was able to add into these new versions that stemmed from the songs’ live growth over time is mainly about vocal performance. That little extra note in the bridge of Bring Me To Life (“only you…”) is a good example. That’s been something I do live when I’m really enjoying the moment and want to push further.
Continue reading Q&A with Amy Lee on Stack: “I wanted to flip the script and challenge myself [about vocal rhythms on new track Imperfection]”

NEWS.COM.AU: Evanescence have removed the “compromise” rap from biggest hit

Amy Lee of US band Evanescence is touring Australia — with a full orchestra — next year. Picture: Sony Source: Supplied

Amy Lee of US band Evanescence is touring Australia — with a full orchestra — next year. Picture: Sony Source: Supplied

Re-recording their biggest hits with an orchestra means Evanescence’s Amy Lee has been able to remove *that* rap from Bring Me to Life

EVANESCENCE’S Amy Lee is rewriting history on the band’s new album.

Their fourth release Synthesis is the opposite of an unplugged effort — rather Lee has re-recorded the band’s old material an even more dramatic and bombastic manner, with a full orchestra and heavy electronics.

That includes their breakthrough 2003 hit Bring Me To Life. And there’s something missing from the version you know — that rap, by guest vocalist Paul McCoy.

“God bless the rap, it’s part of what got us on the radio I guess,” Lee says. “At least according to all the rules of radio that I don’t agree with or understand. The rap wasn’t part of our original idea or sound, it was a compromise in many ways. So to be able to go back to the original vision for the song was great.”

Here’s Evanescence looking moody, with singer Amy Lee far left. Picture: Sony Music Source: Supplied

Here’s Evanescence looking moody, with singer Amy Lee far left. Picture: Sony Music Source: Supplied

It’s not uncommon for an artist to go back and record their songs — Lee embraced being to able to revisit the band’s signature hit after performing it live at every concert they’ve played since it was release.

“The recording of a song that ends being the one you hear the most through history is usually when the song was just freshly written. You’re still learning it yourself and getting used to what the notes are and how the parts go. That’s true for Bring Me to Life for sure. After doing it live for so long there’s different vocal choices I’ve made and different things we got to use in this version.”

And no rap.

“I forget the rap’s there now to be honest,” Lee says. “At the time it was a big issue, it was our first single. I wanted people to understand who we were. That’s a struggle you always fight as an artist. If we only had the one hit, if no one ever heard from us again then nobody would understand who we were. We’ve made it past that point so the rap doesn’t make me angry any more. I’m so glad to put a new version out there without the rap though.”

Continue reading NEWS.COM.AU: Evanescence have removed the “compromise” rap from biggest hit